Categories
Landscaping

Organic Gardening Compost

Organic Gardening Compost landscaper dallasOrganic Gardening Compost : saves You Money and Helps Save the Earth.

Synthetic fertilizers are out and organic gardening compost is the in thing with farmers who are trying out the holistic way in planting.

Organic Gardening

With organic gardening, farmers are going back to the most basic way of growing plants and trees and that is by being one with nature. The latter phrase meaning that they no longer use artificial fertilizers and the commercially available pesticides, but instead rely on the natural environment to be able to grow produce.

Organic Gardening Compost

Compost is the mixture of decaying plants, animal manure or other organic materials that is being used as a fertilizer. While nature can work on compost by itself, men can speed up the process by using the equation air plus water, carbon, then nitrogen is equal to compost.

Composting in Simpler Terms

Don’t be overwhelmed by the word equation stated above. This is not really a complex thing. This can actually be done in a simple and step-by-step ways.

Hot Compost

While others opt to burn fallen leaves, such is wealth for gardeners as this is the start of their composting process. The first thing they have to do is to bag those leaves. Clipped grass from mowed surfaces can also be put in the bag.

To bring in oxygen and a quantity of water enough to dampen the leaves systematically, put several holes near the bag’s top and at its bottom. The holes will also let the carbon dioxide out and excess water as well. Pour in about two shovelful of garden soil into the bag where the leaves are, then shake it to mix the contents. Or if not possible, just roll the bag thoroughly.

Mixing should be done on a schedule after every other week.

Check on the leaves and pour water to moisten those if they’ve dried out. In about two to three months, alas, your compost is ready. The contents of the bag that look like dark and flaky stuff are your compost.

To use that dark and flaky stuff as a fertilizer for your plants, put an inch thick layer on the soil’s top layer. That will then be absorbed by the plants. It actually acts as fertilizer and at the same time pesticide and can even prevent weeds from growing. It also contributes in conserving water as your plants won’t need as much.

To be able to come up with the same output at lesser time, you can also try shredding the leaves first before sacking it all up.

Cold Compost

The difference between cold and hot compost is that the first is easier to do than the latter which takes more effort.

Cold compost can be done by simply gathering wastes from your own backyard, may it be leaves, grass clippings and weeds, then piling them up. Allow a period of six to twenty-four months for earthworms and other microorganisms break the stuff down. While waiting, you can add up materials to your pile. In this scenario, the stuff at the bottom decomposes first.

But aside from the long wait, this type of compost is not as effective as the hot compost. It cannot kill weeds and pathogens. Also, before using such, you should screen out for undecomposed materials from the pile.

Whatever you may choose between the two, you’re still on the winning side by using organic gardening compost because not only you are saving up money but more so, you are helping out conserve and clean our environment.

This post “Organic Gardening Compost” was kindly provided by Dallas Landscaper ( Dallas Landscaping company ) .

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Well drilling

Drill Buying Considerations

Water Well Drilling Oklahoma Drill Buying ConsiderationsDrill Buying Considerations : if you are researching the purchase of a new drill, this article suggests some points you may want to include in your decision prior to spending your hard-earned money on a drill.

1) With Cord or Without?

This is the first important decision to make. There are several advantages and disadvantages to each type of drill:

– Cordless drills tend to be more convenient to use. They can easily be used in any location without the need of power cords and power outlets; so long as the battery stays charged. The significant advantage of corded drills is that there is no limitation on how long they can be used. With a corded drill, you will never find yourself waiting for batteries to charge.

– While it may sounds strange, cordless drills tend to be lighter than corded drills. But, if you choose a high-power cordless drill (18V and 24V), these models are often as heavy or heavier than their corded counterparts.

– Cordless drills are safer. There is no cord acting as a trip hazard.

– If torque and long run times are needed, a corded drill will perform better. Although there are many high-power models available for cordless drills, corded drills will always be able to supply more power, and they will be able to supply it for a longer period of time.

– Even the best batteries have a finite lifetime. You should expect that the batteries in your cordless drill will only last two to three years at most. Batteries for cordless drills are very costly to purchase; it’s usually cheaper to just buy a new cordless drill than it is to purchase two new batteries. So if you are purchasing a cordless drill, expect to be buying a new drill in several years time. By comparison, if you choose a corded drill you are set for at least 10 years, if not more.

– If you are going to opt for a cordless drill, be sure to get a cordless drill with Lithium Ion (Li-Ion) batteries; do not buy a drill with Nickel-Metal-Hydride (NiMH) batteries. Li-Ion batteries are better; they are more powerful, they have longer lifetimes, they do not have “memory” issues, and they are less harmful to the environment because they contain less harmful metal elements.

2) Pick a Chuck

The chuck is the part of the drill that holds the bits in place. There are two picks to make here: size and type.

Standard chuck sizes are 1/4″, 3/8″, and 1/2″ with the standard size being 3/8″. If you want the ability to use large diameter drill bits, go with the 1/2″ chuck since many bigger bits will not fit in a 3/8″ drill. If you do not need or want the ability to accommodate larger bits, the 3/8″ chuck is a better option since typically they have higher bit speeds with the smaller chuck sizes.

There are two types of chucks: keyed and keyless. With the keyed chuck, you use a mechanical key to tighten and loosen drill bits. For drills with keyless chucks, the drill bit is tightened into the chuck by holding the chuck with your hand while powering the drill. The mechanical advantage of the keyed chuck makes it able to hold bits tighter so there is less chance of your drill bit slipping in the chuck. The advantage of the keyless chuck is that it is much quicker to change drill bits, and there is no key to lose or keep track of.

3) Important Features

To get the most benefits out of your new drill, be sure that it has these important features:

– Reverse. Even if you don’t plan to use your drill for driving screws, reverse is a very important feature to have for removing bits that get stuck. If you are getting a drill that has a keyless chuck, it will always have reverse (otherwise there would be know way to get the drill bit out), you only need to check for the presence of this feature if you are buying a drill with a keyed chuck.

– Variable speed. If you want to use your drill to drive screws, this is essential. If you don’t plan to drive screws, this is still an important feature as it makes it much easier to drill clean holes since different materials require bit speeds.

– Speed range settings. This is only needed if you plan to drive screws. If you are, this feature is critical to have. Having the lower speed range makes it much easier to drive screws.

– A torque clutch. Again, this is only required if you plane to drive screws. The clutch allows you to set a maximum torque point after which the drill will stop. This is extremely useful when driving screws so that you do not over-drive the screw into the material. If you are driving large amounts of screws (like in decking), this feature is a real life-saver.

This post Drill Buying Considerations has been kindly provided by Well Drilling Oklahoma

Categories
Landscaping

Aerating Your Customers’ Lawns

Aerating Your Customers’ Lawns Landscapers Cleveland

Aerating Your Customers’ Lawns : if your customers don’t have the thick, lush lawns they’ve imagined, you can rack your brain trying to figure out the cause. While you interrogate them about their watering practices and second guess yourself on fertilization, the problem might be a lot simpler. It might be time to aerate.

If your customers don’t have the thick, lush lawns they’ve imagined, you can rack your brain trying to figure out the cause. While you interrogate them about their watering practices and second guess yourself on fertilization, the problem might be a lot simpler. It might be time to aerate.

Are there tracks in the lawn?

Are there tons of weeds despite a good fertilizer with weed prevention? Are pests becoming a problem? Is water pooling in the lawn after heavy rains? Are there bare spots that you haven’t been able to help? The soil might have compacted, and it might just take a little aerating to make the lawn thrive. If the customer has clay soil or it’s a dry area, you’ll need to aerate more frequently. There’s a simple and pretty unscientific way to tell when it’s time to aerate. Grab a stick. If the soil is difficult to penetrate with the stick, you should aerate.

You should choose a nice, clear day to aerate. If the soil is wet, you will have a huge mess and a lot of explaining to do to customers. You’re also going to get compacted soil much more quickly if it’s wet. If it’s too dry, you won’t be able to penetrate the soil with an aerator. Pay attention to the weather. You should have nice weather for as long as possible (a week at least) after you aerate for maximum benefits.

If you don’t yet have an aerator attachment for your mowers,

you can rent one. I recommend renting them before you buy one anyway. There are different types of aerators with different features, and the best way to determine which you prefer is to try them out. Aerators with spreaders allow the plugs (or cores) of soil to be spread throughout the lawn. It’s fine to leave them, but they should be raked to make the lawn look better right away. If you have a lot of clay soil yards or live in a dry area, you want longer spikes on your aerator. You also want more spikes to play the odds. The more spikes you have, the more likely at least some will penetrate harder, dryer soils. In particularly dry areas, it’s a good idea to water a day or two before aeration, just to promote penetration. Then simply mow in the same pattern you were going to mow anyway, with the aerator attached.

Aerating a lawn allows air, water, and nutrients to get to the roots of the grass. It allows earthworms to move about. Other good little organisms that take care of pests and naturally fertilize the lawn will thrive. You’ll also break through some weed roots, and the healthier lawn will have a better fighting chance against the weeds. You’ll have fewer problems with flooding, and the lawn will be more drought-tolerant. Bare spots will fill in much better.

Right after aerating is the perfect time to overseed

if you are trying to repair bare spots or filling in during fall for a green winter lawn. By core aerating the lawn, you’ve perfectly prepared the soil to thrive on the seeds. This should be done as soon as possible after aerating, and it’s best to remove the pulled plugs from the lawn if you’re going to seed. It’s also a great time for water to get deep into the soil in dry areas, so watering after aeration is preferable. If it’s fertilization time, it’s also a good idea to aerate first if it’s needed.

In hot, dry climates, you might need to aerate in summer, fall, and at the beginning of spring, depending on how dry the winter was. Cooler weather grasses are better aerated early in fall. They are too fragile and will recover more slowly if aerated in the summer, and fall is the perfect time to prepare them for winter. If the soil is heavy with clay, you might need to aerate more often. It’s a good idea to keep your stick (knife, screwdriver, etc) handy to check if the soil has compacted.

Aerating will save your customers time and money watering in the summer as their lawns will be better able to withstand drought, and they will be thrilled with their healthier, fuller lawns. It’s well worth investing in a good aerator.

This post “Aerating Your Customers’ Lawns” has kindly been provided by Landscaper Cleveland, ( one of the best landscaping companies Cleveland Ohio ) .